NDR Updates

Posted on: August 8, 2017

Demolitions part of becoming a more resilient city

Minot has been working to make itself a community that isn’t just recovering back to the point where it was before the flood, but working to be a community that is making great strides to be more resilient to the waters of the Mouse River.

The City of Minot is on its way to becoming more resilient. After the flood of 2011 the City has been working to make itself a community that isn’t just recovering back to the point where it was before the flood, but working to be a community that is making great strides to be more resilient to the unpredictable waters of the Mouse River.

One of the crucially important activities that has been taking place to make Minot more resilient is the demolition of damaged structures or structures that need to be removed from the eventual footprint of the Mouse River Enhanced Flood Protection Project. To make way for better flood control like flood walls, levees, and flood water retention, the City has been buying and relocating buildings that are in areas where flood mitigation structures are to be built.

Once the buildings are acquired, they are inspected to see if they are in good enough shape for public auction. To put them up for auction, the homes are inspected to see if they are in generally good condition and free of lead-based paint and asbestos-containing materials. Those that do not pass inspection are then scheduled to be demolished. If asbestos is found, then the buildings are abated in accordance to federal requirements. Once the abatements have been completed, the water, sewer, gas, electrical and all other utilities are disconnected from the structure and the physical demolition of the structure begins.

From the peak of the roof to the basement and footings, every part of the structure is removed from the lot before it’s backfilled. Once the lot has been backfilled, compacted and graded, it is then seeded and turned into green space.

Much like construction, demolitions can only take place during the summer months. Since the start of the demolitions three years ago, roughly 250 structures have been demolished with an average of about 80 structures a summer. So far this year, there have been 30 structures demolished and the sites backfilled and seeded for grass, putting this summer on target for about 80 demolitions.

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